Presenters


Keynote Speakers

Friday Nov. 9, 2018 - 7:00pm-8:30pm

Robyn Henderson-Espinoza, Ph.D.

Theme: Sacramento - Sacrament
Saturday Nov. 10, 2018 - 8:00pm-9:30pm

Heidi Schlumpf

Theme: Resistencia – Resistance
What Church and Political Movements Can Learn from One Another

The Women’s March, the #Metoo movement and the Parkland students have attracted young, energetic activists in a post-Trump America. Meanwhile, church reform movements, like Call To Action, are linking younger and more seasoned reformers to continue to press for change in the church in the era of Pope Francis. What can these movements learn from one another? Schlumpf will offer some tips and hold up some role models from both “secular” and church resistance movements.

Sunday Nov. 11, 2018 - 8:45am-12:00pm

Elvira Arellano

Theme: Santuario - Sanctuary

Preconference Presentations

Preconference #1

Hosted by Call To Action, FutureChurch and Women's Ordination Conference

#CatholicToo: Lifting Up Catholic Silence Breakers in the Age of #MeToo (Half-day, Located in Executive Salon 2)

The #MeToo movement has put an unprecedented spotlight on the ways that men in power have used their authority to abuse, harass, silence and demean women and other marginalized people. This panel lifts up the brave voices of women silence breakers who are speaking out against the ways that misogyny and patriarchy in the Roman Catholic Church has impacted them and members of their community. Sacred space will be held for survivors, and chaplains will be available for participants as needed. Trigger warning for sexual abuse, assault, misogyny.

Regina Bannan, Ph.D. Regina Bannan is retired from teaching at Temple University and has been involved with the Women’s Ordination Conference and the Southeastern Pennsylvania chapter since 1978. She is a regular contributor to the WOC blog, The Table, and cannot resist a demonstration for any cause she believes in.

Martha Ann Kirk, Th.D. Martha Ann Kirk is a participant in the first Women’s Ordination gathering in 1975 and author of Women of Bible Lands: A Pilgrimage to Compassion and Wisdom which includes women’s leadership in early Christianity.

Jennifer O’Malley Jennifer O'Malley is an ordained Roman Catholic Womenpriest and Special Education Director for Dispute Resolution. She serves a Eucharistic Community in Long Beach and well as being involved with the LA Catholic Worker House. She is a queer feminist who is an advocate for the full inclusion of women and the LGBTQ community in our church and world.

Martha Sanchez Martha Sanchez was born in a small town in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. At the age of fifteen, Martha migrated to the United States to seek a better future for herself. A former religious educator and Catholic church worker, Martha has been working alongside La Unión Del Pueblo Entero (LUPE) for the past twelve years where she currently leads LUPE’s team of community organizers as they work with local communities to identify and develop leadership and their ability to mobilize their friends and neighbors around local issues.

Virginia Saldanha Virginia Saldanha taught Catechetics for 14 years. She was Executive Secretary of the Women’s Desk of the Archdiocese of Bombay and currently serves as Secretary of the Indian Women Theologians Forum & Ecclesia of Women in Asia and continues to work with women’s organizations on issues of violence to women. She is the author of Woman Image of God, has edited four books and contributes articles to various theological and Catholic publications.

Kate McElwee Kate McElwee currently serves as the Executive Director of the Women's Ordination Conference, where she has worked since 2011. Kate attended Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts to study Religion and later attended SOAS in London, earning an M.A. in International Human Rights Law. Kate serves on the Leadership Circle of Women's Ordination Worldwide and the Parish Council of Caravita Catholic Community in Rome, where she and her husband have lived since 2014.

Katie Lacz Katie Lacz works at Women’s Ordination Conference as Program Associate. She is a spiritual director, writer, and mother, and earned her Master of Divinity from the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley, CA, and her B.A. in Journalism from Ithaca College. She lives outside Boulder, CO, with her spouse and two children.

Christine Haider-Winnett Christine Haider-Winnett is a mom, ordained Roman Catholic Woman Priest, and community organizer with over a decade of experience in the Catholic Church reform movement. She serves as Communications Manager of Call To Action and is founding priest of Via Sophia Ministry, a ritual and spiritual direction practice that bridges Catholic tradition and feminist praxis. Christine holds a BA in Peace and Global Studies from Earlham College, a Masters in Divinity from Pacific School of Religion and a Certificate in Women’s Studies and Religion from the Graduate Theological Union. She lives in Davis, California with her spouse, toddler and two cats.

Deborah Rose-Milavec Deb Rose-Milavec serves as Executive Director of FutureChurch (futurechurch.org), a national organization seeking changes that will provide all Roman Catholics the opportunity to participate fully in the life, ministry, and governance of the Church. Deb has more than 20 years of experience working in community and Church-based organizations with a strong background in theology, Church history and Catholic social teaching. Her professional experience includes serving as Executive Director at the New Choices Domestic Violence Prevention Agency and Shelter in Shelby County, Ohio; Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee; and prior to coming on board for FutureChurch, Vice President and Project Director for Catherine of Siena Virtual College, offering women’s and gender studies worldwide with a special outreach in Africa, China, India, the Philippines, Thailand and other countries in Asia. Deb holds a Master’s Degree in Theology and a Bachelor’s Degree in International Studies. She trained as a lay pastoral minister in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati and an Associate of the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati.

Russ Petrus Russ Petrus serves as Associate Director of FutureChurch (futurechurch.org), a twenty-eight year old national organization seeking changes that will provide all Roman Catholics the opportunity to participate fully in the life, ministry, and governance of the Church. He is also responsible for the design and content management of the Catholic Women Preach website (catholicwomenpreach.org), a project of FutureChurch. Russ holds a Master of Divinity from the Weston Jesuit School of Theology (now a part of the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry). Prior to joining the FutureChurch team, Russ was actively engaged in faith formation, religious education, and liturgical ministries in parishes Cleveland, OH and Boston, MA.

Preconference #2

With Mark Van Steenwyck, Center for Prophetic Imagination

Uprooting Empire, Mark Van Steenwick (Half-day, Located in Executive Salon 2)

In this session, participants will explore how Christianity has become interwoven with systems of oppression to spread toxic narratives and nurture an imperial spirituality. We will explore the ways we've internalized those narratives and how we may begin to uproot them, both within ourselves and in society. Together, we will ask "What toxic narratives do I need to uproot so that I can begin to find liberation for myself and my society?" and "How can we reclaim a liberatory faith that challenges the injustices around us?"

Mark Van Steenwyk Mark Van Steenwyk is the Executive Director of the Center for Prophetic Imagination and the founder, along with his wife Amy, of the Wildflower Worker in Minneapolis. Mark is the author of The unKingdom of God: Embracing the Subversive Power of Repentance,That Holy Anarchist: Reflections on Christianity and Anarchism, and A Wolf at the Gate. For the past fifteen years, Mark has engaged with communities around the continent as a teacher, organizer and spiritual provocateur.

Preconference #3

With Stacey Merkt, Jennifer Harbury, Marsha Griffin, Sue Weishar, Ann Williams Cass (Moderator)

Life Experiences with Immigration Issues (Full-day, Executive Salon 2)

A panel with four presenters from the Rio Grande Valley who come with a wide variety of experience dealing with immigration issues.

Stacey Merkt Stacey Merkt "What difference did the Sanctuary Movement Make in the 80s?" Sharing her personal experience of being part of that movement, being arrested, and being imprisoned while pregnant. Suggestions for the movement now.

Jennifer Harbury Jennifer Harbury, Rio Grande Valley (RGV) – Married a Guatemalan in the 1980’s, husband was tortured and killed there. Continues to work on immigration issues in the Rio Grande Valley, specifically on separation of children, zero tolerance, and refusal of government to accept asylum cases at the bridges.

Marsha Griffin Marsha Griffin, MD, pediatrician, (RGV), "Traumatic stress on immigrant children, their journey, detention, and separation of families

Sue Weishar Sue Weishar, PhD, University of Loyola, New Orleans. Led research project for Carnegie Institute with the University of Florida on "Recovering the Human Face of Immigration," exploring what faith communities throughout the South are doing and could be doing.

Ann Williams Cass Ann Williams Cass serves as Director of Proyecta Azteca. A resident of the Rio Grande Valley for nearly 40 years, Ann was a member of the Sanctuary Movement in the 80s. During that time she was the administrator of the United Farm Workers Union and Pastoral Administrator of Holy Spirit Parish in McAllen, TX. She continues to work on immigration issues with the RGV Equal Voice Network.

Preconference #4

With Jennifer Reyes Lay, Fred Dabrowski, Black Moses Rankins Jr., Amy Sheber Howard, Tony Desantis, Crystal King

Anti-Racism Training hosted by CTA’s Anti-Racism Team (Full-Day, Executive Salon 4)

This workshop led by the CTA Anti-Racism Team will be an opportunity to engage a new resource for local faith communities and chapters to examine the connected histories and theologies of white supremacy and colonialism within Catholicism. Participants will learn about and wrestle with the ways these structures and theologies continue to show up in their own lives and faith communities today. Because Catholicism was foundational in establishing white supremacy and colonialism as theological goods ordained by God, Catholics, particularly white Catholics, have a responsibility to know the history they have inherited, repent of their complicity in these structural evils, and take action to eradicate white supremacy and colonialism in their own lives, faith communities, and society.

Tony Desantis Tony Desantis is a member of the CTA Anti-Racism Team, and a member of the Vision Council. He is also the president of the Delaware Valley Association of Rail Passengers and is a prison minister, lector and coordinator of Saturday afternoon Dinners (Joe’s Place) at Sacred Heart Church in Camden, New Jersey.

Fred Dabrowski Fred Dabrowski is a member of the CTA Anti-Racism team, the CTA-RGV Texas chapter and an at large member of the Vision Council. He’s also active in other peace and justice organizations in the Rio Grande Valley and West Michigan.

Black Moses Rankins Jr Black Moses is a native of New Orleans, LA and a member of St. Mary’s of the Angels Parish. He is an anti-racist organizer with the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond Training Team and a graduate of Tulane University with a Bachelor’s in Afrikan Studies and Sociology. His work includes being Co-Convener of Color for Students Organizing Against Racism at Tulane (S.O.A.R.), providing leadership for Young Leaders of New Orleans’ Freedom Library, and working with the People’s Institute Youth Agenda and Kwanzaa Freedom School. He has also worked with College Track New Orleans as a Student Life Mentor and recently taught a course called “Brotherhood.” Black Moses is currently a 2017 Soros Justice Youth Activist Fellow and the Program Director at Boys and Girls Westbank Unit.

Crystal King Crystal King serves as Director of Administration for Call To Action. She joined the Call To Action staff in 1998. She handles day-to-day office administration which includes billing and payments, accounting, mail and postage, office supplies, and provides clerical assistance on projects as needed. In addition, Crystal supports conference registration and other administrative tasks. Crystal was born and raised in Chicago and is the sixth of seven children.

Amy Sheber Howard In her work in higher education and nonprofits, and in community settings, Amy has brought a passion for awareness of who is included and who is left out and of ways we can each be a part of ongoing personal and systemic change. She is enthusiastic about companioning processes of transformation in individual and group/community work.

Jenn Reyes Lay Jennifer is an eco-feminist theologian and midwife of justice who lives in St. Louis, MO with her husband Roger and dog Bella. She is a 3rd year MDiv student at Eden Theological Seminary, and currently works as the Administrator of the Office of Presiding Bishop for the Ecumenical Catholic Communion. Jennifer has served as a member of the Call To Action anti-racism team for the past four years and is a current member of the national Public Theology and Racial Justice cohort. She also worked for three years as Executive Director of the Catholic Action Network, the St. Louis chapter affiliate of CTA, and has served in leadership with the CTA 20/30 cohort. She is passionate about the work of liberation and the intersection of race and religion. She agrees with Irenaeus that, “the glory of God is the human person fully alive,” and is working to bring into being a world where all life can live into the fullness for which it was created.

Preconference #5

Intentional Eucharistic Communities Gathering (Full Day)

Intentional Eucharistic Communities (IECs) are those small faith communities, rooted in the Catholic tradition, which gather to celebrate Eucharist on a regular basis. Born in the enthusiasm flowing from Vatican II for a church of the people, some IECs were instituted in parishes, some were created as alternatives to the parish, some retain close ties with the institutional church, and some function independently. All are characterized by shared responsibility for the governance and life of the community. Through sharing liturgical life and mutual support for one another, members are strengthened to live Gospel-centered lives dedicated to spiritual growth and social commitment.

Preconference #6

With World Heritage Mission Tour

Mission Tour of San Antonio (Full Day, meet at CTA Registration Desk to proceed to the bus - bus will return at 2:30 pm)

A guided tour of all four San Antonio missions located on the mission trail! We’ll start at Mission Espada which is the oldest mission, built in 1690. Then, head to Mission San Juan Capistrano which was originally built in East Texas and moved to San Antonio in 1716. Next, Mission Concepción, which is the best preserved of all the missions. And last, Mission San Jose, the biggest of all the missions, which was built in 1720. This guided San Antonio missions tour will provide you an insider look at what life was like in the 18th century, and how these important religious sites have earned their UNESCO World Heritage status. Lunch is included with your tour registration.

Breakout Sessions (A) - Saturday Nov 10th 8:30am-9:45am

Workshop Session A.1
Intergenerational Storytelling: An Exploration in Narrative Theology, part of the 20/30 Project for Mentoring and Leadership, featuring Emily Morris and John Noble (Executive Salon 4)

Emily Morris Emily is a native of London, Ohio, where she grew up in a big Irish-Catholic family. She attended the University of Notre Dame and went on to serve as a Jesuit Volunteer for two years in the Pacific Northwest. Emily currently lives in Yakima, Washington where she hikes, cooks, and works at a community health center. She loves to visit her elderly friends and imagines a future working in hospice care. Emily is inspired by a vision of the Catholic Church where all church members are actively engaged in work for Justice, Peace, and Reconciliation both inside and out of the walls of the church.

John Noble John is a Roman Catholic student pursuing a Master of Divinity at Brite Divinity School in Fort Worth, Texas. His research interests include Catholic history, the ecumenical movement, and applying liberation theology to the daily lives of Catholics around the world. He has recently worked with groups like Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement on issues of environmental and economic justice, the Des Moines Catholic Worker, and Roman Catholic Womenpriests-USA. John hopes to eventually pursue a Ph.D. in Church history or theology, and to develop strategies for empowering laity and the poor through community organizing. When he’s not working or studying, John can be found reading, posting theology memes, and spending time with his girlfriend Quinn and new puppy Shiloh.

Workshop Session A.2
Life in Color: A Loving Creator and LGBTQ+ Identities, part of the 20/30 Project for Mentoring and Leadership, featuring Morgan Bengel and Breanna Mekuly (A.2, Executive Salon 5)

Morgan Bengel Morgan is a recent graduate of Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, MI, and was recently accepted as a Candidate to the Dominican Sisters of Grand Rapids. She loves to read, explore, write, travel, drink coffee, and chat. She writes: “I could never tire of listening to people share their stories. Through these stories and my relationship with God I have been moved in tremendous ways toward wonder & awe, unity, and grace. I have been inspired by the women of my Dominican community who make social justice a way of life and infuse their love into everything they do. I am grateful for their example and I am emboldened by their support as I embrace the future that God and I are co-creating.”

Breanna Mekuly Breanna currently lives in Erie, PA and works with the Benedictine Sisters at their soup kitchen and with Sister Joan Chittister’s ministries. Breanna studied theology at Vanderbilt Divinity School. She is fascinated by the intersection of sexuality and spirituality, which she approaches through a feminist lens. Whenever possible, Breanna loves taking adventures and is often joyfully distracted by the beauty of the natural world.

Workshop Session A.3

The Sacrament of Resistance, Judith Norman, Harry Gunkel and Moureen Kaki (Executive Salon 1)

This workshop will explore the way in which resistance itself is sacramental, focusing on the movements for justice in Israel and Palestine. The workshop facilitators have traveled throughout the region and have met with faith leaders and practitioners who use the profound spiritual resources of their faiths to guide and energize their work resisting occupation. We will discuss their strategies and principles, and the concrete forms that a sacrament of resistance takes in the lived experience of people working against the occupation of the Holy Land.

Harry Gunkel Harry Gunkel is a retired pediatrician living in San Antonio. Harry was a mission volunteer to the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem from 2007-2010 and continued to live in occupied Palestine until 2012. His experience in the area included multiple visits to Gaza. He is a founding member of San Antonio chapter Jewish Voice for Peace and San Antonio for Justice in Palestine, and is a member of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship Palestine Israel Network.

Judith Norman Judith Norman is a founding member of both the San Antonio chapter of Jewish Voice for Peace and San Antonio for Justice in Palestine. She has visited Palestine twice and spent time in Gaza in 2015 and 2016. She has given numerous talks on Palestine and Israel from a Jewish, human rights perspective. She lives in San Antonio and is a professor of philosophy at Trinity University. She also runs a Philosophy For Children program in the San Antonio public schools.

Moureen Kaki Moureen Kaki is a Palestinian-American student of anthropology at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She is a founding member of both Students for Justice in Palestine and San Antonio for Justice in Palestine. She has lived intermittently in the West Bank, but grew up mostly in San Antonio where she has also done work with anti-racism and anti-police brutality movements.

Workshop Session A.4

Is the Parish Dead? Deb Rose-Milivec & Russ Petrus, FutureChurch (Executive Salon 2)

As the number of available and active priests has declined, the U.S. bishops have relied on a strategy of closing and merging parishes. The effects of that strategy have been gut wrenchingly painful for many. Yet, beyond the sting of losing a parish, the Church has yet to take into consideration its responsibility for the role of the parish in the life and stability of the surrounding community. What happens to the grocery store in areas where there are already food deserts? What happens to property values? Does the Church model “white flight” as it closes parishes in communities of color that are already economically fragile? In this session, we will look at data and discuss the bishops’ strategy of closing/merging of parishes in the light of social justice as a form of racism and classism.

Russ Petrus Russ Petrus serves as Associate Director of FutureChurch (futurechurch.org), a twenty-eight year old national organization seeking changes that will provide all Roman Catholics the opportunity to participate fully in the life, ministry, and governance of the Church. He is also responsible for the design and content management of the Catholic Women Preach website (catholicwomenpreach.org), a project of FutureChurch. Russ holds a Master of Divinity from the Weston Jesuit School of Theology (now a part of the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry). Prior to joining the FutureChurch team, Russ was actively engaged in faith formation, religious education, and liturgical ministries in parishes Cleveland, OH and Boston, MA.

Deborah Rose-Milavec Deb Rose-Milavec serves as Executive Director of FutureChurch (futurechurch.org), a national organization seeking changes that will provide all Roman Catholics the opportunity to participate fully in the life, ministry, and governance of the Church. Deb has more than 20 years of experience working in community and Church-based organizations with a strong background in theology, Church history and Catholic social teaching. Her professional experience includes serving as Executive Director at the New Choices Domestic Violence Prevention Agency and Shelter in Shelby County, Ohio; Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee; and prior to coming on board for FutureChurch, Vice President and Project Director for Catherine of Siena Virtual College, offering women’s and gender studies worldwide with a special outreach in Africa, China, India, the Philippines, Thailand and other countries in Asia. Deb holds a Master’s Degree in Theology and a Bachelor’s Degree in International Studies. She trained as a lay pastoral minister in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati and an Associate of the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati.

Workshop Session A.5 – Saturday Nov 10th 8:30am-9:45am

Are All Really Welcome? Unconscious Bias and Microaggressions in Faith Communities, Jenn Reyes Lay (Executive Salon 3)

We all have unconscious bias that we carry with us from our life experiences and the cultures we have grown up in. When our bias remains unseen and unaddressed it can negatively impact our relationships and interactions with others through microaggressions – subtle or indirect acts of discrimination against marginalized groups. We in CTA and the progressive Catholic movement want to create truly welcoming and inclusive communities, but we may not be aware of ways that microaggressions and our unconscious bias prevent us from truly living into that vision. This workshop will give an introduction to understanding unconscious bias and microaggressions, how they show up in communities of faith, what we can do to counter harmful bias and retrain our brains to truly be more inclusive and open to the beautiful diversity of God’s creation.

Jenn Reyes Lay Jennifer is an eco-feminist theologian and midwife of justice who lives in St. Louis, MO with her husband Roger and dog Bella. She is a 3rd year MDiv student at Eden Theological Seminary, and currently works as the Administrator of the Office of Presiding Bishop for the Ecumenical Catholic Communion. Jennifer has served as a member of the Call To Action anti-racism team for the past four years and is a current member of the national Public Theology and Racial Justice cohort. She also worked for three years as Executive Director of the Catholic Action Network, the St. Louis chapter affiliate of CTA, and has served in leadership with the CTA 20/30 cohort. She is passionate about the work of liberation and the intersection of race and religion. She agrees with Irenaeus that, “the glory of God is the human person fully alive,” and is working to bring into being a world where all life can live into the fullness for which it was created.

Breakout Sessions (B) - Saturday Nov 10th 10:00am-11:00am

Workshop Session B.1
20/30 Project Mentors Panel, featuring mentors from the 20/30 Project for Mentoring and Leadership (Executive Salon 4)

Hear from the inspiring mentors who have accompanied CTA’s Young Leaders through discernment and action in intersections of faith and justice. This panel discussion will explore how we share wisdom and cultivate community across generations.

Deborah Rose-Milavec Deb Rose-Milavec serves as Executive Director of FutureChurch (futurechurch.org), a national organization seeking changes that will provide all Roman Catholics the opportunity to participate fully in the life, ministry, and governance of the Church. Deb has more than 20 years of experience working in community and Church-based organizations with a strong background in theology, Church history and Catholic social teaching. Her professional experience includes serving as Executive Director at the New Choices Domestic Violence Prevention Agency and Shelter in Shelby County, Ohio; Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee; and prior to coming on board for FutureChurch, Vice President and Project Director for Catherine of Siena Virtual College, offering women’s and gender studies worldwide with a special outreach in Africa, China, India, the Philippines, Thailand and other countries in Asia. Deb holds a Master’s Degree in Theology and a Bachelor’s Degree in International Studies. She trained as a lay pastoral minister in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati and an Associate of the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati.

Russ Petrus Russ Petrus serves as Associate Director of FutureChurch (futurechurch.org), a twenty-eight year old national organization seeking changes that will provide all Roman Catholics the opportunity to participate fully in the life, ministry, and governance of the Church. He is also responsible for the design and content management of the Catholic Women Preach website (catholicwomenpreach.org), a project of FutureChurch. Russ holds a Master of Divinity from the Weston Jesuit School of Theology (now a part of the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry). Prior to joining the FutureChurch team, Russ was actively engaged in faith formation, religious education, and liturgical ministries in parishes Cleveland, OH and Boston, MA.

Kate McElwee Kate McElwee currently serves as the Executive Director of the Women's Ordination Conference, where she has worked since 2011. Kate attended Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts to study Religion and later attended SOAS in London, earning an M.A. in International Human Rights Law. Kate serves on the Leadership Circle of Women's Ordination Worldwide and the Parish Council of Caravita Catholic Community in Rome, where she and her husband have lived since 2014.

Katie Lacz Katie Lacz works at Women’s Ordination Conference as Program Associate. She is a spiritual director, writer, and mother, and earned her Master of Divinity from the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley, CA, and her B.A. in Journalism from Ithaca College. She lives outside Boulder, CO, with her spouse and two children.

Christine Haider-Winnett Christine Haider-Winnett is a mom, ordained Roman Catholic Woman Priest, and community organizer with over a decade of experience in the Catholic Church reform movement. She serves as Communications Manager of Call To Action and is founding priest of Via Sophia Ministry, a ritual and spiritual direction practice that bridges Catholic tradition and feminist praxis. Christine holds a BA in Peace and Global Studies from Earlham College, a Masters in Divinity from Pacific School of Religion and a Certificate in Women’s Studies and Religion from the Graduate Theological Union. She lives in Davis, California with her spouse, toddler and two cats.

Workshop Session B.2
From #CatholicToo to #IWill: Harnessing Our Truth-telling to Build a Movement, featuring leaders from Call To Action, FutureChurch and Women’s Ordination Conference (Executive Salon 1)

This workshop gives participants an update on the #CatholicToo movement, and offers clear action items for how Catholics can harness truth-telling to demand accountability of our religious leadership in the era of #MeToo. There will also be opportunities to share experiences and brainstorm future actions. Hosted by the #CatholicToo organizations: Call To Action, FutureChurch and Women’s Ordination Conference. Chaplains will be available for participants as needed. Trigger warning for issues of sexual abuse and assault, and misogyny. Featuring leaders from Call To Action, FutureChurch and Women’s Ordination Conference.

Deborah Rose-Milavec Deb Rose-Milavec serves as Executive Director of FutureChurch (futurechurch.org), a national organization seeking changes that will provide all Roman Catholics the opportunity to participate fully in the life, ministry, and governance of the Church. Deb has more than 20 years of experience working in community and Church-based organizations with a strong background in theology, Church history and Catholic social teaching. Her professional experience includes serving as Executive Director at the New Choices Domestic Violence Prevention Agency and Shelter in Shelby County, Ohio; Program Director for the American Friends Service Committee; and prior to coming on board for FutureChurch, Vice President and Project Director for Catherine of Siena Virtual College, offering women’s and gender studies worldwide with a special outreach in Africa, China, India, the Philippines, Thailand and other countries in Asia. Deb holds a Master’s Degree in Theology and a Bachelor’s Degree in International Studies. She trained as a lay pastoral minister in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati and an Associate of the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati.

Russ Petrus Russ Petrus serves as Associate Director of FutureChurch (futurechurch.org), a twenty-eight year old national organization seeking changes that will provide all Roman Catholics the opportunity to participate fully in the life, ministry, and governance of the Church. He is also responsible for the design and content management of the Catholic Women Preach website (catholicwomenpreach.org), a project of FutureChurch. Russ holds a Master of Divinity from the Weston Jesuit School of Theology (now a part of the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry). Prior to joining the FutureChurch team, Russ was actively engaged in faith formation, religious education, and liturgical ministries in parishes Cleveland, OH and Boston, MA.

Kate McElwee Kate McElwee currently serves as the Executive Director of the Women's Ordination Conference, where she has worked since 2011. Kate attended Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts to study Religion and later attended SOAS in London, earning an M.A. in International Human Rights Law. Kate serves on the Leadership Circle of Women's Ordination Worldwide and the Parish Council of Caravita Catholic Community in Rome, where she and her husband have lived since 2014.

Katie Lacz Katie Lacz works at Women’s Ordination Conference as Program Associate. She is a spiritual director, writer, and mother, and earned her Master of Divinity from the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley, CA, and her B.A. in Journalism from Ithaca College. She lives outside Boulder, CO, with her spouse and two children.

Christine Haider-Winnett Christine Haider-Winnett is a mom, ordained Roman Catholic Woman Priest, and community organizer with over a decade of experience in the Catholic Church reform movement. She serves as Communications Manager of Call To Action and is founding priest of Via Sophia Ministry, a ritual and spiritual direction practice that bridges Catholic tradition and feminist praxis. Christine holds a BA in Peace and Global Studies from Earlham College, a Masters in Divinity from Pacific School of Religion and a Certificate in Women’s Studies and Religion from the Graduate Theological Union. She lives in Davis, California with her spouse, toddler and two cats.

Workshop Session B.3

Sanctuary, Unions and Labor Rights for Immigrant Workers, Jorge Mujica of Arise (Executive Salon 3)

Many immigrants, with or without proper documents, are increasingly becoming union members. Under the current administration, both them and their organizations are under attack, and unions are reacting to this under what we know as a "sanctuary union" movement and actions, from trainings in case of raids, to individual defense in court. The workshop will review and discuss this actions.Chicago

Jorge Mujica Jorge Mujica is a Mexican immigrant, living in Chicago for over 30 years. He is the Strategic Campaigns Organizer for Arise Chicago, a faith-based worker center which educates and trains workers to fight against workplace injustice. Jorge has organized hundreds of workers into labor unions and helped workers recover millions of dollars of stolen wages. He is one of the main conveners of the 2006 immigration marches. He is also a published writer and and awarded journalist, and a National Board member of the National Writers Union.

Workshop Session B.4

A Call to Solidarity and Witness from the Borderlands, Katie Sharar (Executive Salon 2)

The first part of this workshop will be devoted to understanding the present context of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands (and the ways that this extends beyond a specific geographical framework to include most of the U.S.): how we arrived to this moment in time, and the challenges and struggles it presents. This will include a brief overview of history, geography, and policy. We will then turn to the question of what it means to create a culture of hospitality in our communities, and what it means to bear witness to the struggles of others while keeping in mind the multiple identities of participants and communities.

Katie Sharar Katie Sharar has lived in the U.S./Mexico borderlands since 2003, when she first arrived as an undergraduate. The grit, the heartbreak, the possibilities, and the hope have kept her there more or less ever since. She’s worked at several houses of hospitality for recently arrived immigrants and refugees (in El Paso and Austin); attended graduate school in Tucson; taught college students from around the country about border issues for a semester-long off-campus experience; and currently works at a binational organization serving recently deported migrants and asylum seekers in Nogales, Sonora. She also like to read, drink coffee, and make a daily ritual of watching the sunset whenever possible.

Breakout Sessions (C) - Saturday Nov 10th 2:15pm-3:30pm

Workshop Session C.1
Storytelling for a Strong and Interdependent Movement, part of the 20/30 Project for Mentoring and Leadership, featuring Betsy Ericksen and her mentor Vicky Barrios-Newsom, (Executive Salon 4)

Betsy Ericksen (20/30 Project Young Leader) and Vicky Barrios-Newsom (20/30 Project Mentor) are community organizers who use the power of storytelling to move people to act on their values, and build strong interdependent movements.

In this workshop, Vicky and Betsy will teach us how to tell and listen to stories to strengthen relationships, ground us in our values, and support us to resist isolation in our activism and movements. Join Betsy and Vicky to learn storytelling practices that you can use in many different contexts: at meetings, prayer gatherings, or before action planning or strategic visioning.

Betsy Ericksen Betsy lives in an intentional community in Boston, is interested in mysticism and monasticism, and organizes mothers and grandmothers for climate justice with Mothers Out Front.

Workshop Session C.2
Expanding the Image of Jesus, part of the 20/30 Project for Mentoring and Leadership, featuring Revalon Wesson and Black Moses Rankins Jr., (Executive Salon 5)

Join Young Leaders Revalon Wesson and Black Moses Rankins Jr. in exploring the varying images of Jesus and how racial and gender diversity in the Catholic Church reflects the Imago Dei in nontraditional ways. Revalon is a Twin Cities visual artist and theology student and Black Moses is a community organizer in New Orleans. Their workshop will be interactive so come prepared to make a rosary or do some art - no experience necessary!

Revalon Wesson Revalon is from Stillwater, MN and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in theology, concentrating in social transformation. She’s passionate about advocating for social change on behalf of those who feel like they do not have a place to belong, particularly the LGBTQ+ community, people of color, and women. Revalon wishes to aid in strengthening faith-based communities for people who are often pushed to the fringes of society by creating safe spaces where they can spiritually flourish. She hopes that by celebrating and uplifting humanity’s diversity she can inspire those with faith and a heart of justice to strive for a more beautiful, complete, and welcoming church community.

Black Moses Rankins Jr Black Moses is a native of New Orleans, LA and a member of St. Mary’s of the Angels Parish. He is an anti-racist organizer with the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond Training Team and a graduate of Tulane University with a Bachelor’s in Afrikan Studies and Sociology. His work includes being Co-Convener of Color for Students Organizing Against Racism at Tulane (S.O.A.R.), providing leadership for Young Leaders of New Orleans’ Freedom Library, and working with the People’s Institute Youth Agenda and Kwanzaa Freedom School. He has also worked with College Track New Orleans as a Student Life Mentor and recently taught a course called “Brotherhood.” Black Moses is currently a 2017 Soros Justice Youth Activist Fellow and the Program Director at Boys and Girls Westbank Unit.

Workshop Session C.3

Wrestling with the Legacy of White Supremacist Colonial Christianity, Jenn Reyes Lay (Executive Salon 1)

This workshop will give a brief introduction to the day long retreat of the same name that CTA will be offering as a resource to interested communities and chapters throughout the country. Participants will get an overview of the program content and structure and be able to sign up if they are interested in bringing the full day retreat to their local community.

The retreat and workshop are created for white Christians to learn about the intersecting structures of white supremacy and colonialism within Christian history and wrestle with the ways they continue to show up in their own lives and faith communities today. Because Christianity was foundational in establishing white supremacy and colonialism as theological goods ordained by God, white Christians have a particular responsibility to know the history they have inherited, repent of their complicity in these structural evils, and take action to eradicate white supremacy and colonialism in their own lives, faith communities, and society.

Jenn Reyes Lay Jennifer is an eco-feminist theologian and midwife of justice who lives in St. Louis, MO with her husband Roger and dog Bella. She is a 3rd year MDiv student at Eden Theological Seminary, and currently works as the Administrator of the Office of Presiding Bishop for the Ecumenical Catholic Communion. Jennifer has served as a member of the Call To Action anti-racism team for the past four years and is a current member of the national Public Theology and Racial Justice cohort. She also worked for three years as Executive Director of the Catholic Action Network, the St. Louis chapter affiliate of CTA, and has served in leadership with the CTA 20/30 cohort. She is passionate about the work of liberation and the intersection of race and religion. She agrees with Irenaeus that, “the glory of God is the human person fully alive,” and is working to bring into being a world where all life can live into the fullness for which it was created.

Workshop Session C.4

Comforting the Afflicted, Afflicting the Comfortable, Dignity San Antonio (Executive Salon 2)

An interactive experiential look at potential barriers be seeing Alva GBTQI Catholics. Followed by personal sharing about dignity’s role and comforting the afflicted and afflict the comfortable

Jessica Ramirez Jessica Ramirez recently obtained her MA in Communication from the University of Texas at San Antonio. Ms. Ramirez’s research interests are focused on the influence of representations and ascriptions by social institutions on identity formation and negotiation. As part of her degree requirement, she produced a documentary called “The Narrow Path”, in which she examines the development and reconciliation of the participants’ conflicting identities, and the impact that being a part of their church has on the development of their identity. Ms. Ramirez is a member of Dignity San Antonio and supports the organization’s efforts to work for the dignity and respect of all LGBTQI+ individuals in the Catholic church.

Minerva Z. Mendoza Minerva Z. Mendoza is a retired educational administrator from Houston I.S.D, single mom of two beautiful daughters and grandmother of the cutest 14 month old girl you will ever know. She earned degrees and certifications from University of Houston, Texas A&M University and University of Houston at Clear Lake. Worked as a teacher, counselor, supervisor, assistant principal and 18 years as an Elementary School Principal. She then retired to San Antonio after 33 years in education when her youngest daughter came here to study. Once in SA, she began a new life, filled with arts and crafts, politics, new job experiences (bussing tables, political campaigns, Six Flags Fiesta Texas and now working for an Attorney). When her daughter came out she was eager to learn about the LGBTQI community. She has been engaged in a variety of organizations that serve and support the LGBTQI community including PFLAG, Stonewall Democrats, and Dignity. She is been involved with Dignity San Antonio for over 10 years. This journe has been filled with new knowledge and beautiful people.

Deb Myers Deb Myers has called San Antonio home since 1984. She has been engaged in social justice ministry for over 30 years in a wide variety of organizations and programs. She worked with AVE(Anti-Violence Effort), an interfaith coalition through the San Antonio Archdiocese to bridge communities and neighborhoods, served on the Archdiocesan Justice and Peace commission for 10 years. She has been active in Pax Christi both locally and nationally. She also served on the Mayors Commission for a More United San Antonio post 911. Her longest and most dedicated work has been with Dignity(LGBTQI Catholics) . She has served on the local, regional, and national boards of the organization and has been one of the core animators of the local chapter for over 30 years. Currently, with her spouse, Nickie Valdez, she coordinates a network of GLBTQI friendly clergy, churches, and lay people in San Antonio, called PRO (Progressive Religious Organization) San Antonio. Professionally, she is a physical therapist, working most of the week rehabilitating trauma patients at University Hospital, and the rest of the time she is a clinician and clinical evaluator for people with ALS at UT Health. She is inspired by her spouse of 31 years, Nickie Valdez. They were legally married in 2015. She is passionate about the environment, loves to gardening and photography.

Workshop Session C.5
Breaking the ICE: Local Action Against Incarceration of Migrants, John Marchese, Jessica DeCou and Tom Ricker of the Quixote Center (Executive Salon 3)

How well would you navigate the immigration system in the United States? In this workshop, we will explore the intersection of immigration policy and our criminal “justice” system, with a focus on local actions to challenge the system. In doing so, we will highlight where people are being held, who is managing those spaces, who is being targeted, and how.

John Marchese John Marchese is Executive Director at the Quixote Center in College Park, Maryland. He has a Ph.D. in Literature from the University of Notre Dame and an M.A. in Philosophy from Loyola University Chicago. His journey of solidarity with migrants started in earnest when he was a Claretian Volunteer in Back of the Yards in Chicago for two years, including one year at a food pantry in Back of the Yards and another at Su Casa Catholic Worker, where he continues to serve as board treasurer. He also spent a summer with Notre Dame’s International Summer Service Learning Program volunteering at the Scalabrinian Center for Migration Studies in Brazil.

Jessica DeCou Jessica DeCou is Program Coordinator for the Quixote Center’s InAlienable program. She earned a PhD in Theology from the University of Chicago in 2012.

Tom Ricker Tom Ricker is a Program Associate with the Quixote Center. He has worked for 20 years as an advocate for human and civil rights in Latin America and in the United States. In addition to work with the Quixote Center, he teaches International Human Rights for the University of Maryland University College online system and tutors students in government and economics at Houston Community College.

Breakout Sessions (D) - Saturday Nov 10th 3:45pm-4:45pm

Workshop Session D.1
Breaking Chains, Repairing Ties, part of the 20/30 Project for Mentoring and Leadership, featuring Kelly Hanley and Stephen Njau (Executive Salon 4)

Kelly Hanley and Stephen Njau, two Young Leaders in the 20/30 Project for Mentoring and Leadership, will share about their work disrupting the violence of punitive “justice” in two distinct contexts. Kelly, a teacher at a Cristo Rey school in San Jose, CA will reflect on her experience implementing restorative justice practices in Catholic high school and offer tools for conference members to bring back to their communities. Stephen Njau, a leader of African Catholic Young Adults of Philadelphia will share about the work he’s doing to build community between youth of color and people who are incarcerated.

Stephen Njau Stephen was born in Mombasa, Kenya and raised in Philadelphia. He’s part of St. Gabriel Small Christian Community, African Catholic Young Adults of Philadelphia and is a member of St. Catherine of Siena parish. He has a particular passion for mentoring youth and writes: “My Catholic faith grants me comfort in knowing that everything I do for the love of Christ has a purpose in bringing me closer to Him.”

Kelly Hanley Kelly is a cradle Catholic and San Francisco native, which she lovingly calls “a glorious combo.” She’s a proud product of Catholic education and second generation Catholic educator. Kelly graduated from Holy Cross and Providence College, earned her Masters in Education through the PACT Program, followed by the Notre Dame ENL Program, and taught in Santiago, Chile. She’s currently in her 7th year of teaching and 2nd year at Cristo Rey San Jose Jesuit High School, where she teaches social justice to juniors, English to seniors, and helps run campus ministry. Kelly finds the work to be “holy, joyful, occasionally devastating, and hard.” She hopes to design her social justice curriculum in a way that will continue to break down classroom walls and build mutual relationships where her students’ voices and experiences are honored and learned from. Kelly is passionate about justice, and has a particular interest in juvenile ministry and how it’s related to issues of police violence and incarceration.

Workshop Session D.2
Young Catholics Reimagining Vocation, part of the 20/30 Project for Mentoring and Leadership, featuring Karina Varela and Abby Rampone, (Executive Salon 5)

Young Leaders Karina Varela and Abby Rampone are empowering young Catholics to discern their unique roles in the Body of Christ and claim their capacities to transform the church. Abby, a seminarian at Union Theological Seminary in New York City, will share about the conference she is organizing for Catholic college and graduate students to build relationships, explore and (re)imagine vocation in their own lives and communities, and collectively work toward justice in the Church. Karina Varela, a teacher and activist in Rio Grande Valley, will lead participants in a creative vocational discernment practice she’s developing for youth at her local parish.

Karina Varela Karina is a recent graduate of St. Edward’s University in Austin, TX where she studied English Literature and Religious and Theological Studies. After graduation, she moved back to her hometown on the Texas-Mexico border. Karina works as a tutor at a public alternative high school for 14-20 year olds where she regularly witnesses the ways that the US’s unjust immigration policies impact education, incarceration rates, healthcare and a variety of other issues.

Abby Rampone Abby is a Vermonter, a writer, and a feminist Catholic. She’s concerned with creating radical, resilient communities in the face of environmental degradation and patriarchal violence. After graduating from Williams College last June, she moved to New York City, where she is pursuing an MDiv at Union Theological Seminary. At Union, she enjoys living and working with the Women’s Interfaith Residency Program – and hopes to continue to foster interfaith feminist communities after graduation. Abby also loves reading, hiking, travel, and cats.

Workshop Session D.3

Compassionate Living Today, Compassionate San Antonio (Executive Salon 3)

How to live courageously and compassionately in this time of polarization. Strategies for creating a powerful inner sanctuary to reconnect and reconcile our deepest values within our family and through our presence in the world.

Compassionate San Antonio is a grassroots movement that promotes, supports and celebrates San Antonio’s commitment to be a world-class compassionate city: one where the civic government, the religious and volunteer organizations, the businesses, the community and its educational institutions come together to recognize the importance and value of compassion in the life of a city and by doing so create an ethos of compassion and a safety net for its most vulnerable citizens. #compassionateSA

Workshop Session D.4

Borderland Theology: Intersectional Justice at the Crossroads of Identities, delfin bautista (Executive Salon 2)

This presentation will provide participants with an introduction to a queer theological approach called “borderland theology” in order to frame our commitment to social justice and antiracism/anti-oppression work through an intersectional lens. We will explore “borderland” identity so that we can better understand how systems of oppression and dynamics of resilience are interconnected.

Workshop Session D.5

Doing Justice: Effective Strategic Nonviolence, Sharon Shepela & Evelyn Johnson Moore (Executive Salon 1)

At CTA 2014 Rev. James Lawson, who taught nonviolence to the students who held the first sit-ins in Nashville in 1960, said that the hope for social justice lies with educating and inspiring people to use strategic nonviolence to force institutions to change. Our interactive workshop will biblically ground our social justice action; teach proven effective nonviolent strategies; use case study group work and offer a variety of resources and tools for local, contextual application. We are informed, interactive and funny. Whether you are writing your first letter of protest, or are a committed activist, this workshop has something for every attendee.

Sharon Toffey Shepela, PhD Sharon Toffey Shepela, Ph.D. is an award-winning professor emerita of psychology and peace studies at the University of Hartford and co-author of the book, Courageous Resistance: the Power of Ordinary People. A Pace e Bene (nonviolent living) trainer she offers workshops, retreats and lectures described by CTA attendees as "Life-giving!" "Animated, practical."

Evelyn Johnson Moore, M.ED Evelyn Johnson Moore M.ED has consulted with congregations and non-profits for over 20 years in strategic thinking, conflict transformation, and leadership coaching. She is part of the lay leadership of her United Methodist faith community whose ministries and advocacy are with asylum seekers, persons in recovery, and homeless families.

Workshop Session D.6

Starting and Sustaining a CTA Chapter, a panel hosted by CTA chapter leaders (San Antonio Ballroom)

Are you looking for a way to build community with other progressive Catholics and quickly respond to justice issues in your community? Join this group of experienced CTA chapter leaders as they share their best practices for organizing a chapter.